Telephone:

0121 448 3001

 

Citizenship

 

Citizenship Education at Spring Hill High School helps to provide learners with the knowledge, skills and understanding required to become informed and active citizens of the UK and promotes positive engagement in the political process. The scheme of learning is centred around investigation of current and topical affairs and fosters students’ natural curiosity and awareness of the key British values, the operation of democracy and how individuals may have their voice heard and make a difference locally and nationally.

The curriculum aims to assist learners to develop a commitment to participation in volunteering and other forms of responsible action that they may take into adulthood. It also aims to ensure that all learners become politically astute and able to consider political, social, economic and environmental issues critically, weigh evidence, debate and make informed arguments clearly and coherently in a range of contexts. This is achieved by exploring:

  • How the UK is governed, its political systems and how citizens may participate in democratic society
  • Individuals human and legal rights and responsibilities and situations where rights may compete or conflict
  • The role and need for the legal system in society and how laws are created and enforced, including the aims of sentencing and themes of fairness
  • The global community, intergovernmental organisations and the issues they face such as globalisation and conflict resolution

The Scheme of Study is split into 4 overarching themes:

  • Life in Modern Britain
  • Rights and Responsibilities
  • Politics and Participation
  • Active Citizenship (Campaign strategies and pressure groups)

Opportunities are provided for learners to engage in enrichment activities and experiences outside the classroom. After completing case study investigations of voluntary organisations and pressure groups and reflecting critically on what constitutes successful active citizenship in a modern context, learners can embark on a campaign of their own to raise funds or awareness to effect change in their local, national or global community on an issue close to their hearts. Previously this has constituted engagement with charities and other organisations and advocating for change to people in positions of power. In 2016, GCSE students presented a case for mounting a campaign to their local MP in school, arguing on issues such as welfare state and promoting tolerance and the benefits of multicultural society in the wake of the Paris attacks. The department works with Oxfam Education, who assist students in planning and orchestrating their campaigns and provide the potential for careers stemming from volunteering activities.

 

Key Stage 3

The ASDAN Citizenship Short Course accredits up to 60 hours of Citizenship activity over a time period that suits the individual/group. Students select from a list of proposed challenges and present a portfolio of evidence of their activities undertaken across 6 key themes:

  • Rights and Responsibilities
  • Community and Volunteering
  • Government and Democracy
  • Law and Order
  • Finance
  • Global Citizenship

 

Key Stage 4 and above

After completion of Key Stage 3 Religious Studies & Citizenship, students will have the opportunity to choose to progress through two GCSE routes:

GCSE Citizenship Studies (2 year course) - (the new AQA specification, course code 8100). The specification enhances students’ writing and speaking styles and develop the communication skills increasingly sought by employers.

GCSE Religious Studies Short Course (2 year course)

There is a third route available for students who are unable to access the GCSE courses. This route follows the Asdan Beliefs & Values Citizenship short courses, and gives students an opportunity to continue exploring a range of important religious and citizenship issues, regardless of ability. Students have the opportunity to be accredited with a certificate depending on the number of hours of study they complete.

 

GCSE Religious Studies (Short Course)

At Spring Hill High School, students who continue with Religious Studies at GCSE level in key stage 4 will follow the AQA GCSE Religious Studies Short Course specification. This course is delivered over two years.

Students will learn how religion, philosophy and ethics form the basis of our culture, and develop valuable skills that will help prepare them for further study.

Schools who deliver GCSE Religious Studies are required to teach two major world religions. All schools must use the main religion of the United Kingdom as one of their chosen religions, which is Christianity. The second religion students learn about in Religious Studies at Spring Hill High School is Islam.

Students complete one exam at the end of year 11. This exam will be 1 hour and 45 minutes long

 

Useful Websites

Citizenship GCSE (AQA 8100)
http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/citizenship/gcse/citizenship-studies-8100

Asdan Citizenship Short Course
https://www.asdan.org.uk/courses/programmes/citizenship-short-course

Teach It Citizenship
https://citizenshipresources.aqa.org.uk/

Birmingham Agreed Syllabus for Religious Education
http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/religious-studies/gcse/religious-studies-short-course-8061

GCSE Religious Studies Short Course (AQA)
http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/religious-studies/gcse/religious-studies-short-course-8061 http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resources/rs/specifications/AQA-8061-SP-2016.PDF

Asdan Beliefs and Values Short Course
https://www.asdan.org.uk/courses/programmes/beliefs-and-values-short-course

 

 

Religious Studies and Citizenship Curriculum Overview

Year 7

  Term   Subject content
  Autumn 1   Introduction to Religious Studies
  Autumn 2   Rules, fairness, rights and responsibilities.
  Spring 1  

What is authority?

  • Introduction - What is authority?
  • What makes a good leader?
  • Is God the leader?
  • God on earth.
  • Why are sacred writings special?
  Spring 2   How Sustainable is my Community?
  Summer 1    
  Summer 2   Parliament and Democracy

 

Year 8

  Term   Subject content
  Autumn 1   Christianity & Worship
  Autumn 2   Crime and Punishment
  Spring 1   Peace and Conflict
  Spring 2   Advocacy and Representation
  Summer 1   Forgiveness & Reconciliation
  Summer 2   British Values

 

Year 9

  Term   Subject content
  Autumn 1   The Role of Families
  Autumn 2   Rights & Responsibilities
  Spring 1   The Nature of God
  Spring 2   Government and Democracy
  Summer 1   Islam
  Summer 2   Community and Volunteering

 

GCSE Citizenship 8100

Year 10

  Term   Subject content
 

Autumn 1

 

Life in Modern Britain (Section A)

  • What are the principles and values that underpin British society?
  • What do we mean by identity?
  • What is the role of the media and free press?
  Autumn 2  

Life in Modern Britain (Section A)

  • What is the UK’s role in key international organisations?
  • How can Citizens make their voice heard and make a difference in society?
  • Summative assessment of citizenship skills, processes and methods relating to section A
  Spring 1  

Rights and Responsibilities (Section B)

  • What laws does a society require and why?
  • What are a citizen’s rights and responsibilities within the legal system?
  • How has the law developed over time, and does the law protect the citizen and deal with criminals?
  Spring 2  

Rights and Responsibilities (Section B)

  • What are the universal human rights and how do we protect them?
  • How do citizens play a part to bring about change in the legal system?
  • Summative assessment of citizenship skills, processes and methods
  Summer 1  

Politics and Participation (Section C)

  • Where does political power reside in the UK and how is it controlled?
  • What are the powers of local and devolved government and how can citizens participate?
  • Where does political power reside: with the citizen, parliament or government?
  Summer 2  

Politics and Participation (Section C)

  • How do others govern themselves?
  • How can citizens try to bring about political change?
  • Summative assessment of citizenship skills, processes and methods

 

Year 11

  Term   Subject content
 

Autumn 1 & 2

 

Active Citizenship (Section D)

  • Students will form groups and select a citizenship issue close to their hearts, and carry out a campaign or planned course of informed action to address a citizenship issue or question of concern and aimed at delivering a benefit or change for a particular community or wider society (for example, raise awareness or funds)
  Spring 1  

Paper 2 (Sections A and B)

During Spring term 1 students will revisit the topics of:

  • Life in modern Britain
  • Rights and responsibilities

They will undertake open-ended independent and group tasks centred around research, investigation, analysis and evaluation of key themes and contemporary real world issues/scenarios

  Spring 2  

Paper 1 (Sections A and B)

During Spring term 2 students will revisit the topics of:

  • Active Citizenship
  • Politics and Participation

They will undertake open-ended independent and group tasks centred around research, investigation, analysis and evaluation of key themes and contemporary real world issues/scenarios

  Summer 1   Exam preparation and revision

 

 

GCSE Religious Studies (Short Course)

Year 10

  Term   Subject content
 

Autumn 1

 

Section A: Christianity
Key beliefs

  • The nature of God.
  • The problem of evil and suffering.
  • The Holy Trinity (Father, Son and the Holy Spirit)
  • Different Christian beliefs about creation, including the role of Word and Spirit.
  • Different Christian beliefs about the afterlife, including resurrection, life after death, judgement, heaven and hell.
  Autumn 2  

Section A: Christianity
Jesus Christ and salvation

  • The incarnation and Jesus as the Son of God
  • The crucifixion, resurrection and ascension
  • Sin, including original sin
  • The means of salvation, including law, grace and Spirit
  • The role of Christ in salvation including the idea of atonement.
  Spring 1  

Theme B: Religion, Peace and Conflict
Religion, violence, terrorism and war

  • The meaning and significance of peace, justice, forgiveness and reconciliation.
  • Reasons for war, including greed, self-defence and retaliation.
  • The just war theory, including the criteria for a just war.
  • Holy war.
  • Pacifism.
  • Violence, including violent protest.
  • Terrorism.
  Spring 2  

Theme B: Religion, Peace and Conflict
Religion and belief in 21st century conflict

  • Religion and belief as a cause of war and violence in the contemporary world.
  • Nuclear weapons, including nuclear deterrence.
  • The use of weapons of mass destruction.
  • Religion and peacemaking in the contemporary world including the work of individuals influenced by religious teaching.
  • Religious responses to victims of war, including the work of a religious organisation.
  Summer 1  

Theme A: Relationships & Families
Families & gender equality

  • The role of parents in the family.
  • Extended families and the nuclear family.
  • The purpose of families, including procreation, stability and the protection of children, and educating children in a faith.
  Summer 2  

Theme A: Relationships & Families
Families & gender equality

  • Family issues such as same-sex marriages and polygamy.
  • The roles of men and women.
  • Gender equality.
  • Gender prejudice and discrimination, including examples.

 

Year 11

  Term   Subject content
  Autumn 1  

Theme A: Relationships and Families
Sex, marriage and divorce.

  • Human sexuality, including heterosexuality and homosexual relationships
  • Sexual relationships before and outside of marriage.
  • Contraception and family planning.
  • The nature and purpose of marriage.
  • Same sex marriage and cohabitation.
  • Divorce, including reasons for divorce, and remarrying.
  • Ethical arguments related to divorce, including those based on the sanctity of marriage vows and compassion.
 

Autumn 2

 

Section A: Islam
Key beliefs

  • The six articles of faith in Sunni Islam and five roots of ‘Usul ad-Din in Shi’a Islam, including key similarities and differences.
  • The Oneness of God (Tawhid), Qur’an Surah 112.
  • The nature of God: omnipotence, beneficence, mercy, fairness and justice (Adalat in Shi’a Islam), including different ideas about God’s relationship with the world: immanence and transcendence.
  • Angels, their nature and role, including Jibril and Mika’il.
  • Predestination and human freedom and its relationship to the Day of Judgement.
  • Life after death (Akhirah), human responsibility and accountability, resurrection, heaven and hell.
  Spring 1  

Section A: Islam
Authority

  • Prophethood (Risalah) including the role and importance of Adam, Ibrahim and Muhammad.
  • The holy books: Qur’an: revelation and authority and the Torah, the Psalms, the Gospel, the Scrolls of Abraham and their authority.
  • The imamate in Shi’a Islam: its role and significance.
  Spring 2   Exam Preparation and Revision
This term students will recap the key topics of the scheme of work to help them recap knowledge, and will practice exam question techniques to support them in preparation for the GCSE exam.
  Summer 1   Exam Preparation and Revision
This term students will recap the key topics of the scheme of work to help them recap knowledge, and will practice exam question techniques to support them in preparation for the GCSE exam.