Support & Feedback


We are fortunate to receive regular feedback from many friends and visitors of our school on our SEND provision. These can include parents, colleagues from other schools and professional agencies, students or trainee teachers. We appreciate any feedback given to the School - it allows us to celebrate our successes with Special Educational Needs and disabilities and gain views about our provision! Please find examples of recent feedback given to us.


“He is doing brilliant at school and is really happy, he is making better progress and more importantly in his own well-being, he has to be happy to learn and he is. He takes time now to think before he reacts. I am happy with his place at Spring Hill High School and equine therapy has had a massive influence on his empathy and social skills as well as his controlling behaviours. I don’t know where we would be without this therapy.”
(Parent)

“Being at Spring Hill has been life changing for my daughter and changed her life path. She achieved a grade C in Maths GCSE”.
(Parent)

“She has really enjoyed the ‘Well-Being’ group that came into school, it has been good for her, she has since been out and bought herself nail products to help keep them looking tidy. Music Therapy has also been beneficial for her.”
(Parent)

“I enjoy the atmosphere and commitment that everyone has for each other to achieve in their own ways. I am good at helping out and assisting around the school, e.g. pouring drinks at lunch. I enjoy and am good at musical studies. I find mechanics difficult sometimes as I am more of an academic person than a ‘hands-on’ person. There needs to be balance – more extra-curricular activity (debate time, sport). I have seen my school careers advisor 3 or 4 times so far and she helps with my planning of work experience and looking at colleges.”
(Student)

“It was lovely to meet you, Clare and I am glad that you sound as passionate about the AET Progression Framework as I am! I really enjoyed meeting (student’s name) again, after not seeing him for several months. He looked very smart, happy and confident, and the conversation we had together showed an increased level of maturity, especially as he had not been expecting to see me. It was lovely to see how enthusiastic and positive he was about his future, having high expectations of himself. It was a pleasure to see him.”
(Helen, Communication and Autism Team, Birmingham)

Support for Parents

A wealth of resources to support parents of children with SEND are available. If you require further advice, please do not hesitate to speak to our SENDCo, Clare McGrath.

Useful Links

This link gives access to Birmingham SEND information, advice and support service.
www.autismlinks.co.uk

Advocacy Matters is a charity that aims to provide independent advocacy to adults in North and West Birmingham who have a learning or physical disability. It has SEND support and advocates for young people also.
http://www.advocacymatters.org.uk

The following website is for parents who would like more information regarding careers:
www.theparentpoint.com

IPSEA provides a wide range of SEN training for Parents, School Staff, Parent Forums, Support Groups, Local Authority SEN teams, Parent Partnership Schemes …
www.ipsea.org.uk

Testimonials

“Pupils are supported by an external careers advisor who helps them to identify clear goals, career choices and associated career paths.”

Ofsted 2018

Our Sites

Spring Hill High school is a unique school that is split across three sites

Spring Hill High School is located approximately five miles (8 kilometres) north east of Birmingham City Centre and two miles (3 kilometres) from Sutton Coldfield.

Wood End Lane School

Wood End Lane

Building confidence so that each student is prepared for transition into further learning, employment or training in the community.
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Orchard Road School

Orchard Road

A  very nurturing environment that helps students to access education.
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Slade Road School

Slade Road

To care, nurture and educate in a safe environment where students find it difficult to cope in groups.
Read more